So a few days after I notice Google advertising on Yahoo, I see, in the new rss thingie in Gmail, the following: “Ask Yahoo! – Exactly how fast is a knot and how did it get that name? – 5 days ago”. I didn’t subscribe to this, Google just added that in. Are the promoting a Yahoo service now?

Videoblogging history

So the podcasting guys are, clearly, being kids. Fighting over the history of
podcasting. Jees. I documented a lot of stuff on the videoblogging
wiki
during 2004, which was the crucial year during which videoblogging started.
Here’s a copy, in case that resource goes down. For the future. As a disclaimer:
this report probably misses a few important events, there might be a mistake or
two in there as well.

1956

  • AT&T builds the first Picturephone test system. Source

1966

  • Douglas Engelbart demonstrates videoconferencing over a network. "Engelbart
    demonstrated NLS at the Fall Joint Computer Conference in 1968
    in a presentation to several thousand conference participants. He demonstrated
    the mouse, the first working form of hypertext, and a form
    of video teleconferencing." Source

1970

  • AT&T offers Picturephone for $160 per month. Source

1981

July

  • Packet Video Protocol (PVP), by Randy Cole, USC/ISI Source

1992

  • AT&T’s $1,500 videophone for home market. Source

1998

2000

October

  • Samsung releases the first MPEG-4 streaming 3G (CDMA2000-1x)
    video cell phone Source

November

2001

January

July

  • Human Dog begins regularly posting video. Not quite videoblogs,
    but it’s a start. (Summer of Van Torre
    Series http://www.human-dog.com)

September

  • World’s first trans-atlantic tele gallbladder surgery. Source

October

  • NTT Do Co Mo sells $570
    3G (WCDMA) mobile videophone. Source
  • TV reporters use $7,950 portable satellite videophone to broadcast
    live from Afghanistan. Source

2002

October

  • Macro Media conducts videoblogging
    experiment using Flash. Jeremy Allaire
    writes Thoughts on Video Blog Experiment:
    "Over the past several days a number of us Macromedians
    conducted an experiment by using a simple Flash Com
    video communications applications to blog about the Macromedia Dev Con
    developer’s conference."
  • Chuck Olsen
    posts his first videoblog, a tribute
    to Paul Wellstone.

December

2003

February

June

March

September

  • Textamerica Introduces Camera Phone Video Moblogging (videomoblogging?
    movideoblogging? movoblogging?) (12/09/2003,Source)

December

2004

January

April

May

June

July

Aug

  • The first known sign-video-blog entry (using sign language
    in video on a blog)
  • The first known videoblog that allows video-comments.
  • Aug 23 – The collaborative video project, Excuisite Corpse
    begins.

Oct

  • First beta of Creative Commons Publisher
    is released, allowing videobloggers
    to easily upload large videos that the Internet Archive
    will host for free if they have a Creative Commons?
    license.
  • Joshua Kinberg create’s Vipodder, a videoblog
    aggregator based on the iPodder concept using Applescript, Perl, and Cellulo
    2.0
    – a quicktime playlist application for Mac OS X.

Nov

Dec

The new homepage of Odeo is beautiful, but they make a common mistake: with a signup form of 4 fields, why not put it on the homepage? How many new users do they miss like this? At least a certain percentage of users might have become interested users once signed up, and might have signed up if the form was right there.

This is a test of Yahoo’s new RSS to SMS service. I should get this message on my cellphone. Let’s see how it works. And how much text it actually transmits. Text messages are short, right. Well, this is a long test message. Loooooong. Keep testing. yey.

I think I found the absolute BEST way to report bugs and it’s free too.

I have done quite a bit of testing of websites in my day, and reporting bugs is never a joy. But I think I have found what may be the absolute fastest way to report bugs.

The approach consists of a few different parts:

  1. Get a Flickr account and download Grabbr. Grabbr is great for taking screenshots and sending them to Flickr: you click shift F-12, and the app opens with a screenshot in it. Then you click the upload button. Then you open your Flickr window in the browser, click “my fotos” and the screenshot shows up.
  2. Now you are looking at a screenshot of the bug. Click “add note”, and add a few notes on areas of the screen describing the bug. I find this works really naturally, adding the notes forces you to describe what happens, and about half website bugs can be easily described in a screenshot.
  3. Next, I add a bugreport to my bugtracking system. Often, it is just a title and a “see http://….” (the flickr link). That’s all that’s needed for the developers to reproduce and fix the bug.


Here’s an example bugreport at Flickr.
Hover over the photo to see the note.

This is really the fastest bug reporting system I’ve ever used. It takes between 30 and 60 seconds to report most bugs. For real. And you need a lot less text to describe a problem with a screenshot and the notes feature.

Of course it doesn’t work for all bugs. Some bugs take more time. What do you think? Useful? I’m loving it!